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MineFit Monday Move: Roll Those Stiff Shoulders

Posted By Ariel Hill-Davis, Monday, July 10, 2017

Shoulders can be a tricky beast to tackle when it comes to stiffness and impingements. Check out this shoulder mobility tutorial to keep shoulders loose, and understand proper training techniques for on-site warmups.

The Three Parts of the Shoulder “Triangle of Mobility”

1) Lat
latissimus dorsi
teres major
teres minor
(2) Pec
pectoralis major
pectoralis minor
subscapularis
(3) Trap
upper trapezius
sternocleidomastoid
scalenes

Stretch all of these muscles by performing:

1. side bending - lat
2. chest opening - pec
3. head turning side to side - trap

Release all of these muscles at home, doing:

1. lay on a foam roller on your side by your ribcage (lat)
2. lay on a ball on your chest right below the collarbone (pec)
3. lay on foam roll just below the neck (trap)

 

 


Tags:  MineFit  Monday Moves  stretching 

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Friday MineFit TidBit: The What and Why of the Foam Roll

Posted By Ariel Hill-Davis, Friday, September 2, 2016

These days, as exercise is increasingly important, a wide variety of equipment - some of which you may have never seen or used before - is gaining popularity. While some items are just a gimmick, others serve a unique and valuable purpose.

 

 

A foam roller is very valuable addition to anyone’s home or gym environment, and it’s becoming increasingly common as a tool to release tension and increase muscle function and flexibility. The foam roller is used to perform what’s called self-myofascial release. The intent of self-myofascial release is to loosen "trigger points in the muscles" — spots that might be tight or sore after exercise, a long day in a stiffened position, or after performing repetitive job tasks that cause knots and aches in the muscles and tendons.

 

Self-myofascial release using a foam roll releases the tightness and improves blood flow, resulting in reduced muscle soreness, increased flexibility and improved workout performance.  They are inexpensive and can be found  at most sporting goods stores or online shops.

Self-myofascial release is beneficial any time of day, but especially at the start and end of the day.  Taking some time to “roll out” your muscles can help prevent or reduce soreness in the ensuing hours and days. The same technique can be performed using a lacrosse ball (or other small rubber ball) to pinpoint specific trigger points, applying pressure to a smaller, targeted area such as the foot, neck or shoulder.

 

Foam Rolling: How It’s Done

The self-myofascial release technique can be performed on any muscle group in the body, including the back, quads, thighs, calves, hips and shoulders. Begin by placing the foam roller on the ground and then sitting or lying on it so the area you want to target is on the roller. Using slow, controlled movements, roll back and forth across the roller. Don’t be too quick to move on to the next muscle group; work each muscle group for one to two minutes, and if you find an area that is tight or painful, pause over that spot until you feel the muscle release.

Self-myofascial release works as a form of deep tissue massage, so it’s common to experience minor discomfort or pain during the process. If you experience pain that is unbearable, stop. When you are finished, your muscles should feel looser and any pain or discomfort should diminish.

  

This 2014 Study indicates that while Foam Rolling does not increase sports performance, it does have a dramatic effect on levels of muscular fatigue and soreness.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23588488

Tags:  foam roller  MineFit  minefit tidbit  stretching 

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MineFit Tidbit: Carry Your Weight Stretching

Posted By Ariel Hill-Davis, Friday, July 8, 2016

Osteogenic dynamic loads delivered to the skeleton during exercise prevent aging-associated bone fragility. WHAT the heck does this mean?  When you "carry your weight and add an additional “load” or weight-bearing exercise, you can counteract the effects of bone loss which happen over the age of 50.  

Why does bone loss matter?  It is a direct contributor to arthritis, muscle strain and tear, and chronic joint pain.  

Weighted stretching exercises not only improve quality of life, muscle strength, and bone strength... they are a known factor for coordination and balance, reducing the risk of fall-related fractures. 

Exercise is the mainstay of the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis; often however, physicians don’t have enough know-how for evidence-based prescription of exercise. Moreover, the lack of facilities for safe implementation of the exercise programs compound the problem. Worksites and employers can assist in building a structure whereby employees can exercise and sustain their bodies, bones, and muscles.  And, stay on-site for a productive workday, everyday.  

Look at Our Three Items Easy to Implement at the Workplace or at Home.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2811354/  


  


  



Tags:  health  joint health  MineFit  minefit tidbit  safety and health  stretching 

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